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Level of Significance

  • File
  • Local
  • Regional
  • State
  • National

Age (approx)

140yrs

Trees

1

Diameter

0.6m

Height - 10m

Details

Common name
Macadamia nut tree
Botanical name
Macadamia integrifolia
Other name
Jordan Tree
Type
Individual Tree
Condition
Good
Municipality
Gold Coast City (QLD)
Location
176 Hotham Creek Road Willow Vale QLD 4209
Access
Restricted
Significances
  • Horicultural/Genetic (Scientific)
  • Seed/Propagation Stock (Scientific)
  • Remnant (Scientific)
  • Outstanding species (Scientific)
  • Location/Context (Social)
  • Landscape (Social)
  • Park/Garden/Town (Historic)
  • Event (Historic)
  • Person/Group/Institution (Historic)
  • Attractive (Aesthetic)
Date of measurement
05 Jul 2011
Date of classification
09 May 2016

Statement of Significance

The tree is of an important horticultural and genetic value and source of seed propagation stock as it is believed have provided the first seeds for the successful macadamia nut industry in Hawaii. At over 140 years old, it is remnant vegetation and is an outstanding example of its species. It is valued by the local community in this historic part of the Gold Coast as the oldest of its kind, its contribution to the landscape and the fact that is one of the two best known macadamia trees in Australia. It forms a part of the historic township of Pimpama and is associated with the US navy Captain Robert Jordan and the establishment of the successful macadamia nut industry in Hawaii. The tree's is an attractive example of its species.

History

Dr Craig Hardner for University of Queensland received in 2013 a Churchill Fellowship to trace the domestication pathway of this and other trees in Hawaii and their link to global varieties. There is strong evidence that this was one of two trees where Captain Jordan collected nuts in 1892, took them to Hawaii where they were planted in Honolulu and nuts from the resulting at least six trees used to establish the first Hawaiian commercial orchard. By the 1930's, a significant commercial macadamia nut industry was established in Hawaii.

Other

The tree is one of the earliest specimens associated with the productive macadamia nut industry. By the 1990s, Australia surpassed the US as the major producer of macadamias. Australia produces about 35% of the world's production, of which about 70% is exported. The industry is worth more than $150 million annually. The macadamia is mainly consumed as a delicacy or is turned into cosmetic or cooking oil. The macadamia nut was listed as number 9 in the list of typically Queensland icons for the State's 150th anniversary.

Notes

Dr Craig Hardner for University of Queensland received in 2013 a Churchill Fellowship to trace the domestication pathway of this and other trees in Hawaii and their link to global varieties. There is strong evidence that this was one of two trees where Captain Jordan collected nuts in 1892, took them to Hawaii where they were planted in Honolulu and nuts from the resulting at least six trees used to establish the first Hawaiian commercial orchard. By the 1930's, a significant commercial macadamia nut industry was established in Hawaii.
The tree is one of the earliest specimens associated with the productive macadamia nut industry. By the 1990s, Australia surpassed the US as the major producer of macadamias. Australia produces about 35% of the world's production, of which about 70% is exported. The industry is worth more than $150 million annually. The macadamia is mainly consumed as a delicacy or is turned into cosmetic or cooking oil. The macadamia nut was listed as number 9 in the list of typically Queensland icons for the State's 150th anniversary.
Lowndes, A.G. 'Two Historic Macadamia Trees in Australia'. Californian Macadamia Society Year Book 1966.
McConachie, Ian. 'Geneticists seek mother of all macadamias on the Gold Coast', News Bulletin, Australian Macadamia Society Ltd, August 2011, p. 17.
'On the trail of an iconic tree's roots', Courier-Mail, 5-6 January 2013, p. 49.