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Level of Significance

  • File
  • Local
  • Regional
  • State
  • National

Age

96yrs

Trees

2

Diameter

0.2m

Height - 3m

Details

Common name
Persimmon Trees
Botanical name
Diospyros kaki
Type
Plantation
Condition
Good
Municipality
Gold Coast City (QLD)
Location
Corner Hardys Road and Gold Coast Springbrook Road Mudgeeraba QLD 4213
Access
Unrestricted
Significances
  • Landscape (Social)
  • Landmark (Social)
  • Contemporary association (Social)
  • Park/Garden/Town (Historic)
  • Person/Group/Institution (Historic)
Date of germination
01 Jan 1923
Date of measurement
05 Jul 2014
Date of classification
09 May 2016

Statement of Significance

The trees make a significant contribution to landscape of this historic park and former garden of the pioneering Laver family, who contributed to the settlement of Mudgeeraba and with whom they are associated. They are an important feature of the park, which is enjoyed as a picnic area by the community.

History

After settlement, the Nerang and Coomera Rivers became thriving timber industry areas as loggers sought the prized cedar wood. The wood was tied together in rafts and floated down the rivers to meet ocean-going sailing ships. The Gold Coast developed sugar cane and fishing industries. Many of the sugar cane growing areas later became farms. In 1888 a pioneer of the area, J. Myers, established a ferry to enhance the development. He subsequently built Main Beach Hotel on the southern side of the Nerang River in 1888 to accommodate the increased numbers of visitors to the area. In 1923, James Cavill built the Surfers Paradise Hotel. Since this time, the Gold Coast has prospered as a major tourist area.
Since the mid 1870s, the Laver family have been instrumental in the development of the Mudgeeraba area and the wider Gold Coast City through their economic and civic activities. The persimmon trees have a special association with William Henry Laver, who planted them around 1923, and his grandson William Maurice Laver who donated the land on which they stand to the people of the Gold Coast. Both William Henry Laver and William Maurice Laver made a notable contribution to the Gold Coast community though their contribution to the economic development of the area and their service to the community.
A plaque at the site of the trees reads:-
‘Laver Family Park Dedicated 19 July 2003
This park and picnic area had been named in honour of the Laver Family who generously donated the land to the Gold Coast community. William Laver, his wife Elizabeth Ann and infant son, William Henry, arrived in Moreton Bay from Plymouth, England aboard sailing vessel ‘Persia’ in 1856. They drove cattle from Palm Beach/Currumbin and settled in Mudgeeraba in 1878. The pioneering family were well-known teamsters, timber cutters, dairy farmers, hoteliers and servicemen building the Mudgeeraba Hotel in 1884, Hampshire Terrace Hotel in 1887 and the Exchange Hotel (Wallaby Hotel) in 1914. They were local government representatives and active members of the community and sporting groups. Two persimmon trees were planted by William Laver at the turn of the 20th century when the property was purchased.’

Location

The trees are located at the eastern end of the park and are easily distinguishable because of their protective fencing.

Notes

After settlement, the Nerang and Coomera Rivers became thriving timber industry areas as loggers sought the prized cedar wood. The wood was tied together in rafts and floated down the rivers to meet ocean-going sailing ships. The Gold Coast developed sugar cane and fishing industries. Many of the sugar cane growing areas later became farms. In 1888 a pioneer of the area, J. Myers, established a ferry to enhance the development. He subsequently built Main Beach Hotel on the southern side of the Nerang River in 1888 to accommodate the increased numbers of visitors to the area. In 1923, James Cavill built the Surfers Paradise Hotel. Since this time, the Gold Coast has prospered as a major tourist area.
Since the mid 1870s, the Laver family have been instrumental in the development of the Mudgeeraba area and the wider Gold Coast City through their economic and civic activities. The persimmon trees have a special association with William Henry Laver, who planted them around 1923, and his grandson William Maurice Laver who donated the land on which they stand to the people of the Gold Coast. Both William Henry Laver and William Maurice Laver made a notable contribution to the Gold Coast community though their contribution to the economic development of the area and their service to the community.
A plaque at the site of the trees reads:-
‘Laver Family Park Dedicated 19 July 2003
This park and picnic area had been named in honour of the Laver Family who generously donated the land to the Gold Coast community. William Laver, his wife Elizabeth Ann and infant son, William Henry, arrived in Moreton Bay from Plymouth, England aboard sailing vessel ‘Persia’ in 1856. They drove cattle from Palm Beach/Currumbin and settled in Mudgeeraba in 1878. The pioneering family were well-known teamsters, timber cutters, dairy farmers, hoteliers and servicemen building the Mudgeeraba Hotel in 1884, Hampshire Terrace Hotel in 1887 and the Exchange Hotel (Wallaby Hotel) in 1914. They were local government representatives and active members of the community and sporting groups. Two persimmon trees were planted by William Laver at the turn of the 20th century when the property was purchased.’
The trees are located at the eastern end of the park and are easily distinguishable because of their protective fencing.